Stanley Kowalski

War, Brotherhood, and Women (a way-late movie review and the start of a sociological commentary)

War, Brotherhood, and Women (a way-late movie review and the start of a sociological commentary)

What are movies if not a means to compel a viewer–to thoughts and feelings… to carry them within the journey of a character, a storyline so that they may glean something from it.  Whether it be a laugh, an escape, or–my favorite–something much bigger.  Something […]

Stanley Kowalski

Stanley Kowalski

Taking the LIRR’s Babylon line towards Atlantic Terminal on a weekday morning and you may end up in one of the train cars that platform at Boland’s Landing, an employees-only station for the men of the Morris Park maintenance facility in Queens. The cars who […]

Men & Other Generalizations

Men & Other Generalizations

I have long been fascinated by men. Sure, as a woman, aren’t we all? They’re are from Mars, right? A whole other type of human being. Biologically speaking, of course we know there are those different parts but it’s more than that. The Y chromosome […]

Annual Repost: Perhaps Labor Day Doesn’t Come From a Store. Perhaps Labor Day means a bit more.

Annual Repost: Perhaps Labor Day Doesn’t Come From a Store. Perhaps Labor Day means a bit more.

As the Industrial Revolution took hold of the nation, the average American in the late 1800s worked 12-hour days, seven days a week in order to make a basic living. Children were also working, as they provided cheap labor to employers and laws against child […]

I’ve been thinking about…

I’ve been thinking about…

Sailors. Probably because I’m reading Thomas Pynchon’s V. (After two weeks I am on page 38, which means in about 28 more weeks I should be finished. But I don’t want to finish it really. I kind of want to stay there. Each paragraph merits […]

Perhaps Labor Day doesn’t come from a store. Perhaps Labor Day means a little bit more.

Perhaps Labor Day doesn’t come from a store. Perhaps Labor Day means a little bit more.

As the Industrial Revolution took hold of the nation, the average American in the late 1800s worked 12-hour days, seven days a week in order to make a basic living. Children were also working, as they provided cheap labor to employers and laws against child […]