Tag: history

Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture

Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture

On a warm morning this past July, I tried my luck at obtaining a timed entry pass to the new Smithsonian museum in Washington D.C., National Museum of African American History and Culture.  I had been excited about the museum since seeing a segment on […]

The Capital of the United States of America

The Capital of the United States of America

It was kind of hard for me not to hum the intro to House of Cards during my visit. It is kind of the best part of the show. The Capital building peeks out. The White House.  Whoopie. Washington’s phallic monument The National Mall, Lincoln’s Memorial […]

Exploring Nassau County Sanitorium, abandoned Tuberculosis hospital

Exploring Nassau County Sanitorium, abandoned Tuberculosis hospital

Built in 1930, the long vacant Nassau County Sanitorium is set on 140 acres in Plainview, tucked behind the New York Islanders offices and an active sports field. Though there is not much information about the old hospital, which was a Tuberculosis ward, on the […]

Roadtrip: The 56th Inauguration of the President of the United States

Roadtrip: The 56th Inauguration of the President of the United States

January 19, 2009, 11:15 p.m. (LaGuardia, picking up the car rental) January 20, 2009, 2:00 a.m. (Maryland rest stop) January 20, 2009, 3:40 a.m. (Greenbelt, MD Metro station) January 20, 2009, 7:15 a.m. (The sun comes out finally!) January 20, 2009, 7:35 a.m. (Walking through […]

Ostentatious Displays of Personal Aggrandisement

Ostentatious Displays of Personal Aggrandisement

Off the well worn track of my daily life here in New York is a different city. A city that the tourists come to see. 46 million tourists just in 2007 (this and other interesting figures here). Among New York City’s countless attractions and world […]

Perhaps Labor Day doesn’t come from a store. Perhaps Labor Day means a little bit more.

Perhaps Labor Day doesn’t come from a store. Perhaps Labor Day means a little bit more.

As the Industrial Revolution took hold of the nation, the average American in the late 1800s worked 12-hour days, seven days a week in order to make a basic living. Children were also working, as they provided cheap labor to employers and laws against child […]

Sputnik, Chou En-Lai, Bridge On The River Kwai, Lebanon, Charles de Gaulle, California baseball…

Sputnik, Chou En-Lai, Bridge On The River Kwai, Lebanon, Charles de Gaulle, California baseball…

Wanting to make the most of a day here in Kanchanaburi (or getting lazy?), I booked a leisure day tour to hit a variety of sights in the area. My air-conditioned mini-van brought me to Sai Yok National Park, a 500 square-km park that includes […]

Warheads, Tigers and Wild Brogs. Oh. My.

Warheads, Tigers and Wild Brogs. Oh. My.

Last night I awoke to the pounding of the tin roofs around my guesthouse. Startled and helpless,I thought the worst. Transient looters? Back-alley bandits preying on the seclusion of my rented room? Drunken tourists? Emerging in the morning, the noisy culprit was clear. Mangoes. They […]

“Compounds are subject to dissolution.”

“Compounds are subject to dissolution.”

Meet Michael. I spent the afternoon with him, by chance, and learned a good deal about this Buddha fellow I’ve been photographing. After returning to my guest house from the historical park with the remainder of the afternoon at my disposal, I decided to carry […]